Introverts, in contrast, may have strong social skills and enjoy parties and business meetings, but after a while wish they were home in their pajamas. They prefer to devote their social energies to close friends, colleagues, and family. They listen more than they talk, think before they speak, and often feel as if they express themselves better in writing than in conversation. They tend to dislike conflict. Many have a horror of small talk, but enjoy deep discussions.

Susan Cain (via imjohnlocked)

(Source: skeletales)

via marthawells 16 hours ago link 37,063 notes #introverts #queue

tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]

via kattahj 18 hours ago link 203,086 notes #queue #gif warning


ethlenn:

When cats can’t accomplish something, they just pretend they were about to do a different thing.

ethlenn:

When cats can’t accomplish something, they just pretend they were about to do a different thing.

via shoujozanzou 2 days ago link 448,208 notes #cats #gif warning #queue

lohrien:

Fin DAC on tumblr

via lohrien 2 days ago link 430 notes #art #queue

peashooter85:

Ancient Roman Nanotechnology —- The Lycurgus Cup
In the 1950’s the British Museum acquired one of the most amazing archaeological finds from Ancient Rome.  The Lycurgus Cup is a beautiful 1,600 year old goblet crafted from glass by the Ancient Romans.  The cup depicts the punishment of Lycurgus, a mythical king who was ensnared in vines for committing evil acts against the Greek god Dionysus.  The craftsmanship and artwork of the cup are certainly amazing on their own. During the age of the Roman Empire the Romans were master glassmakers, producing some of the finest pieces of glassware in history.   However the Lycurgus cup has one incredible property that is goes far beyond traditional glassmaking.  When exposed to light, the cup turns from jade green into a bright, glowing red color.  For decades historians, archaeologists, and scientists had no idea why this occurred or how the Romans made the cup with such light changing properties.  Then in 1990 a small fragment of the cup was examined by scientists under a microscope.  What they discovered is truly amazing.
The Lycurgus cup is not only made of glass, but is impregnated with thousands of small particles of gold and silver.  Each of the gold and silver particles are less than 50 nano-meters in diameter, less than one-one thousandth the size of a grain of table salt.  When the cup is hit with light, electrons belonging to the metal flecks vibrate in ways that alter the color depending on the observer’s position.  What is even more amazing is that the addition of the particles to the glass was no accident or coincidence.  The Romans would have had to have known the exact mixture and density of particles needed to give the cup light changing properties.  This would have been done without the aid of a microscope, without the knowledge of atomic theory, and 1,300 years before Newton’s Theory of Colors.
Today the Lycurgus Cup has profound affects on modern nanotechnology.  After studying the cup, researchers and engineers are looking to adapt the technology for modern purposes.  A researcher from the University of Illinois named Gong Gang Liu is currently working on a device which uses the same technology to diagnose disease.  Another application of the technology is a possible device which can detect dangerous materials being smuggled onto airplanes by terrorists.  
The legacy of Ancient Rome continues.  Arena’s, baths, arches, and  nanotechnology. 

peashooter85:

Ancient Roman Nanotechnology —- The Lycurgus Cup

In the 1950’s the British Museum acquired one of the most amazing archaeological finds from Ancient Rome.  The Lycurgus Cup is a beautiful 1,600 year old goblet crafted from glass by the Ancient Romans.  The cup depicts the punishment of Lycurgus, a mythical king who was ensnared in vines for committing evil acts against the Greek god Dionysus.  The craftsmanship and artwork of the cup are certainly amazing on their own. During the age of the Roman Empire the Romans were master glassmakers, producing some of the finest pieces of glassware in history.   However the Lycurgus cup has one incredible property that is goes far beyond traditional glassmaking.  When exposed to light, the cup turns from jade green into a bright, glowing red color.  For decades historians, archaeologists, and scientists had no idea why this occurred or how the Romans made the cup with such light changing properties.  Then in 1990 a small fragment of the cup was examined by scientists under a microscope.  What they discovered is truly amazing.

The Lycurgus cup is not only made of glass, but is impregnated with thousands of small particles of gold and silver.  Each of the gold and silver particles are less than 50 nano-meters in diameter, less than one-one thousandth the size of a grain of table salt.  When the cup is hit with light, electrons belonging to the metal flecks vibrate in ways that alter the color depending on the observer’s position.  What is even more amazing is that the addition of the particles to the glass was no accident or coincidence.  The Romans would have had to have known the exact mixture and density of particles needed to give the cup light changing properties.  This would have been done without the aid of a microscope, without the knowledge of atomic theory, and 1,300 years before Newton’s Theory of Colors.

Today the Lycurgus Cup has profound affects on modern nanotechnology.  After studying the cup, researchers and engineers are looking to adapt the technology for modern purposes.  A researcher from the University of Illinois named Gong Gang Liu is currently working on a device which uses the same technology to diagnose disease.  Another application of the technology is a possible device which can detect dangerous materials being smuggled onto airplanes by terrorists.  

The legacy of Ancient Rome continues.  Arena’s, baths, arches, and  nanotechnology. 

(Source: smithsonianmag.com)

via balladedutempsjadis 2 days ago link 2,728 notes #art #history #cool stuff #queue

(Source: sandandglass)

via marthawells 2 days ago link 163,647 notes #ferguson #gif warning #queue

Idris Elba for Details, Septembar 2014 Issue by Mark Seliger

(Source: details.com)

via unstablecactus 2 days ago link 41,014 notes #idris elba #queue

fabionardini:

Fuchsia Necklace designed by Alphonse Mucha and made by jeweler Gorges Fouquet in opal, cabochon sapphire, pearl, and gold (1905)
(via Pin de Susan Lemmon)

fabionardini:

Fuchsia Necklace designed by Alphonse Mucha and made by jeweler Gorges Fouquet in opal, cabochon sapphire, pearl, and gold (1905)

(via Pin de Susan Lemmon)

via elqiao 2 days ago link 2,884 notes #jewellery #queue #art nouveau

umla:

(via simple idea! | KIDS)

umla:

(via simple idea! | KIDS)

via unstablecactus 3 days ago link 28 notes #barbapapa

lohrien:

Illustrations by Galla Yegorenkova

via lohrien 3 days ago link 532 notes #art #queue